Home > Types of Funeral > Church Of England Funeral

Church Of England Funeral

By: Beth Morrisey MLIS - Updated: 28 Jun 2017 | comments*Discuss
 
Funeral church Of England Funeral

Church of England funerals can take any number of formats, from brief and solemn to longer, larger and containing any number of hymns and prayers are requested by the family of the deceased (or as instructed by the deceased prior to his or her death). In general these funerals celebrate the life and personality of the deceased, but also take into account the circumstances of his or her death. Since these services can be personalised in a number of different ways, individuals organising a Church of England funeral should discuss their ideas with a member of the clergy as soon as possible.

The Funeral Service

Church of England funerals usually follow a general order of service including the gathering, readings and sermon, prayers, commendation and farewell, committal and dismissal. A funeral service may also take place within a celebration of Holy Communion, and when this is the case the Liturgy of the Sacrament will usually occur after prayers but before the commendation and farewell.

Gathering

During the gathering the minister may meet the coffin at the door of the church. The minister will welcome everyone and introduce the service. Prayers of Penitence and The Collect may be said. Tributes may also be made at this point.

Readings and Sermons

One or more readings from the Bible will be said and may be followed by psalms or hymns. Following either the reading, prayers or hymns a sermon will be given.

Prayers

The sequence of prayers at a Church of England funeral usually begins with thanksgiving for the life of the deceased, prayers for those who mourn, Prayers of Penitence (if they were not said at the gathering) and finally prayers for readiness to live in the light of eternity.

Commendation and Farewell

During the commendation and farewell the deceased is commended to God in an authorised manner.

Committal

The committal is perhaps the most solemn moment of a Church of England funeral service, and it may take place at the graveside, in a crematorium chapel or in the church before the body of the deceased is transported to the crematorium. During the committal either the coffin is lowered in to the grave or the coffin is moved out of site at the crematorium. If the committal takes place at the grave, then handfuls of earth will be scattered over the top of the coffin once it has been fully lowered. This can be a tremendously emotional time for the bereaved, and all care should be taken to ensure the solemnity of this time.

Dismissal

Generally a Church of England funeral ends with a blessing before the mourners leave.

Following the Funeral Service

What occurs following a funeral service is largely up to the family and friends of the deceased to decide. Many families choose to hold a type of reception in which all of the deceased’s loved ones can come together to support each other. Several weeks or months after the funeral the bereaved may find that they are still having trouble accepting their loved one’s death. These individuals may find great comfort in discussing their thoughts and feelings with a member of the clergy. On the anniversary of the deceased’s death many families choose to hold memorial services or another event to mark the anniversary. If a religious component is desired for such a gathering the family should speak to a member of the clergy about their wishes.

You might also like...
Share Your Story, Join the Discussion or Seek Advice..
Thank you for the detailed information it has been very helpful
No - 28-Jun-17 @ 9:46 AM
Share Your Story, Join the Discussion or Seek Advice...
Title:
(never shown)
Firstname:
(never shown)
Surname:
(never shown)
Email:
(never shown)
Nickname:
(shown)
Comment:
Validate:
Enter word:
Latest Comments
  • Soupie
    Re: Questionnaire: Do You Need Bereavement Counselling?
    My husband had a massive heart-attack early hours of the 21 feb, he had been experiencing some…
    17 June 2019
  • Olga
    Re: Announcing a Death
    My husband passed away in Scotland in May of this year. I live in Spain. .. He was diagnosed with esophageal cancer and was having an treatment…
    17 June 2019
  • Mim
    Re: The Rights to Obtain a Headstone?
    My son was buried with my grandmother a number of years ago I have been trying to erect a headstone to him for a long time…
    17 June 2019
  • DOOGY
    Re: The Rights to Obtain a Headstone?
    I am wanting to put an headstone on my fathersgrave who died over35 years ago but as i only want to put my mothers/his wifes…
    16 June 2019
  • eatmeanddie
    Re: How Grief Affects Your Relationships
    what the hey, my love, my life is gone. the whole world can rot as far as i'm concerned.
    15 June 2019
  • Thorny
    Re: What if There is No Will?
    Hi my mother just died i am an only child only had my mum. Who lived with her partner for 35 years how would my mothers assets be…
    10 June 2019
  • Alexa
    Re: Understanding Probate
    My brother died earlier this year. He was not married but had two sons (9 and 10). He was survived by his parents and siblings. We applied…
    7 June 2019
  • Summerbreezeanne
    Re: Death Certificates
    My friend is estranged from her daughter, her grandson tragically died on the 29/05/19. My friend wants to cancel a holiday, to grieve, the…
    2 June 2019
  • RufDiamond
    Re: What if There is No Will?
    So sad reading through these. Some one dies NO WIll . NO WAY. Why the greed gets the better of ppl and why these ppl fall out with…
    29 May 2019
  • Nrl
    Re: How Grief Affects Your Relationships
    I've just read this article following the death of my father 5 weeks ago. It was sudden and unexpected. Since then I've…
    25 May 2019